Read this before selecting your dehumidifier

Ah, summer chores! There’s a lawn to mow, paint to touch up, a grill to clean. But there are summer maintenance concerns inside, too; namely, taming your home’s No. 1 enemy — moisture.

Summer’s higher temps raise humidity levels in your home, and all that moist air can wreak havoc on interior walls and flooring. Too-high humidity promotes the growth of mold, mildew, and other allergens that take a toll on homeowners, too — especially asthma and allergy sufferers. If you are searching for a good dehumidifier, I would recommend you to check out here.


How Do I Know If My Home is Too Humid?

The EPA recommends keeping your home’s humidity under 60% during the summer and between 25% to 40% in the winter. You can pick up a hygrometer at your local hardware store for less than $25; it’ll measure the air’s moisture content.

But your own comfort — or discomfort — is one of the best indicators of off-kilter humidity. Coughing, sneezing, and clammy hands can all be signs that the air is too humid.  

Read more: How low humidity can take a toll on your health

Your home has a few ways of telling you, too:

  • Wonky wood: Hard-to-open wooden window frames and creaky, buckling hardwood floors are signs of swollen wood caused by too much moisture in your home.
  • Funky smells: A musty odor can indicate growth of moisture-loving mold and mildew.
  • Damaged walls: Peeling wallpaper, blistering paint, and dark spots on walls or the ceiling are all symptoms of excess humidity.
  • Constant condensation: Basic household activities like cooking and showering put moisture into the air, but if you’re seeing condensation on your windows long past bath time, your humidity level is probably too high.

Ah, summer chores! There’s a lawn to mow, paint to touch up, a grill to clean. But there are summer maintenance concerns inside, too; namely, taming your home’s No. 1 enemy — moisture.

Summer’s higher temps raise humidity levels in your home, and all that moist air can wreak havoc on interior walls and flooring. Too-high humidity promotes the growth of mold, mildew, and other allergens that take a toll on homeowners, too — especially asthma and allergy sufferers. If you are searching for a good dehumidifier, I would recommend you to check out here.


How Do I Know If My Home is Too Humid?

The EPA recommends keeping your home’s humidity under 60% during the summer and between 25% to 40% in the winter. You can pick up a hygrometer at your local hardware store for less than $25; it’ll measure the air’s moisture content.

But your own comfort — or discomfort — is one of the best indicators of off-kilter humidity. Coughing, sneezing, and clammy hands can all be signs that the air is too humid.  

Read more: How low humidity can take a toll on your health

Your home has a few ways of telling you, too:

  • Wonky wood: Hard-to-open wooden window frames and creaky, buckling hardwood floors are signs of swollen wood caused by too much moisture in your home.
  • Funky smells: A musty odor can indicate growth of moisture-loving mold and mildew.
  • Damaged walls: Peeling wallpaper, blistering paint, and dark spots on walls or the ceiling are all symptoms of excess humidity.
  • Constant condensation: Basic household activities like cooking and showering put moisture into the air, but if you’re seeing condensation on your windows long past bath time, your humidity level is probably too high.